Mortgage Finance (The 1970s): Inflation, Stagflation, and Disintermediation

A bank holds a loan in its asset portfolio and funds it with low-cost deposits (also known as “portfolio” or “spread” lending). Holding loans in portfolio and funding them with low-cost deposits, works as long as interest rates were stable, and there was a readily available supply of deposits. This model broke down in the 1970s when market interest rates soared…

--

--

--

Interest in FinTech, Deep Tech, Social Psychology, Neuroscience & Neuropsychology, Health and Longivity, and Global Polictics.

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

More Thoughts About Data and Things…

Finding Hope

Today they started bailing out junk bonds

This Portland lot could fit seven small homes — if only it weren’t illegal

How the CRA has Abdicated its’ Duty to Catch Tax Cheats

A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO TOC

WE CANNOT PREDICT THE FUTURE

Buy Low in Japan, Grow High in China

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Mark Justin

Mark Justin

Interest in FinTech, Deep Tech, Social Psychology, Neuroscience & Neuropsychology, Health and Longivity, and Global Polictics.

More from Medium

Fifth Tap: Picnic ‘Milkman 2.0’

#ESGinVC: Lorena Suarez, Managing Partner At Alaya Capital

You guys just don’t get it?

Due Diligence in context